Posted on Apr 06, 2017

Voice vs. Text Part 3: What’s Your Message?

Organizations are faced with difficult decisions when creating a communication strategy.  Making sure the message is received and understood are critical to any successful campaign.  There are situations where email and SMS can properly meet the objectives.  But there are other times where the intended message is more complex and requires added personalization.

What is the message and how is it conveyed?  Is it a brief message, or is it longer and more complex?  Does it require some context and explaining?  Will the message require some feedback?  These questions are all important and require evaluation.

Email, SMS and Social Media are great tools to communicate many messages easily.  However, for more complex messages, voice is the more convenient and reliable option.  For example, if a research analyst needs to convey important financial information that will take some time to explain, then they will not benefit from a huge series of texts or a long-winded email.  There can be miscommunications, and the information will not be given as efficiently as it could be.  There may be follow-up questions from the client, or discussion needed.

In this situation, calling a client is the move.  Even if an analyst needs to get in touch with a lot of people about the same financial event, using a blast voicemail or CIA’s Instant Daytime Dialer will expedite the tedious process of dialing numbers.

A phone call is better at conveying complex information because it allows for discussion and there are immediate opportunities to make everything clear.  If there is any confusion, the customer will get a response instantaneously, and can stay on the line until everything is resolved and understood.

These kinds of messages are common in all industries.  Whether it be in finance, healthcare, legal industries, or education, there are always messages that need explaining in order to be effective.  When it comes to these more complex messages, using a phone call is the best way to keep mistakes at a minimum.